1st- and 2nd-light CALLISTO solar radio spectrometer at IRSOL

It took exactly two years after instrument commissioning to finally get 1st- and 2nd-light at the very same day with Callisto at IRSOL.
Obviously, the Sun started to get active in terms of radio radiation at decametre wavelength (here 45-70 MHz).
Following the NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center classification, the instrument observed twice a small group of type III bursts.
Type III radio bursts are a group of fast drifting radio emissions associated with solar flares. These radio emissions are believed to be excited at the fundamental and second harmonic of the electron plasma frequency.
Solar type III radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool in the understanding of solar accelerated electron beams.
They are a signature of propagating beams of non-thermal electrons in the solar atmosphere and the solar system.
Consequently, they provide information on electron acceleration and transport, and the conditions of the background ambient plasma they travel through.

Christian Monstein

1st light Callisto observation at IRSOL
2nd light Callisto observation at IRSOL

IRSOL researcher Dr. Gioele Janett gets the Edith Alice Müller Award 2020

The Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy (SSAA) officially announced the attribution of the Edith Alice Müller Award 2020 during its assembly that was held online on 9 October 2020. The awards have been attributed to Dr Gioele Janett (IRSOL) and Dr Ewelina Orbzud (UNIGE) for their PhD thesis .

Janett successfully completed his PhD at IRSOL in 2019 with a thesis on

Numerical Methods for the Transfer Equation of Polarized Radiation

under the guidance of Prof. Siddhartha Mishra and Dr. Oskar Steiner.

IRSOL greatly congratulates the awardees.

IRSOL contributes to first WHPI “Show and Tell” days

The first WHPI “Show and Tell” days occurred on 14th-15th September,  2020. The agenda can be found here. During these two days, video tutorials followed by a Q&A about the observational data obtained during the 4th perihelion of Parker Solar Probe by ground- and space-based solar observatories were shown. IRSOL supported this campaign and contributed with unique and complementary ground-based observations, see here.

The video tutorials included information about the scientific value of the data, how the measurements were performed, the data reduction and also how the data can be accessed. The presentations are archived and can be found here.

To directly access the IRSOL contribution, please follow this link.